The Pilkington Creek Tour

Pilkington Creek may be small but it is an important part of the Monterey Bay watershed system. Photo courtesy of Vivienne Orgel.
Pilkington Creek may be small but it is an important part of the Monterey Bay watershed system. Photo courtesy of Vivienne Orgel.

Pilkington Creek is a tiny watershed with a lot to offer. The Pilkington Creek walking tour has 7 historically rich stops highlighting the tiny creek’s past. The tour was made by and begins behind the Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History building marked by an enormous gray whale sculpture. The tour continues roughly ⅛ mile (500 feet) down river ending in the sands of Seabright Beach. We highlight a few stops below, but the complete stories can be found in blog form or in our mobile app, Mobile Ranger Guides.

A screen shot of the stops and the interactive map feature in the self-guided mobile tour.
A screen shot of the stops and the interactive map feature in the self-guided mobile tour.

Beginning upstream, meet the native people that once called Santa Cruz their home.

The modern-day descendants of the Santa Cruz Awaswas are members of the Amah-Mutsun Tribal Band. Photo courtesy of Molly Lautamo.
The modern-day descendants of the Santa Cruz Awaswas are members of the Amah-Mutsun Tribal Band. Pictured here are women from the nearby Rumsien Ohlone tribe. Photo courtesy of Vivienne Orgel.

Discover the ancient uses of native trees and how one non-native tree has became a migrating butterfly’s haven.

Oak trees produce abundant, tannin-rich nuts in the fall. Photo courtesy of Deborah Small.
Oak trees produce abundant, tannin-rich nuts in the fall. Photo courtesy of Deborah Small.

On the sands of Seabright Beach, see how land management practices affect the way the beach looks today.

Photo courtesy of Molly Lautamo.
A wide and sandy Seabright Beach. It was not always this way. Photo courtesy of Molly Lautamo.

InPostGetApp

Go to Mobile Ranger Guides in the Apple App Store
Go to Mobile Ranger Guides in the Google Play Store

Can’t get to Pilkington Creek? No Problem.
Read the stories below: blog-style!

About The Author

Ranger Salazar

Lauren McEvoy is a naturalist and Santa Cruz native with a passion for teaching through writing. She graduated Cum Laude with a BA in Environmental Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz in 2015. Lauren worked for Mobile Ranger as an intern and created a self-guided natural history tour of the UCSC campus. After graduation she has come back to Mobile Ranger to write and help things run smoothly.

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1 Comment

  1. Dan Santillano

    Thank you for writing about the Awaswas people of the Aptos area. It is my new home and I like getting some well-written context in so that I can enjoy my experience, and respect the experiences of the Awaswas peoples, better.

    Daniel Santillano
    Aptos

    Reply

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